If you have an .rpm based Linux distribution, like Red Hat or SuSE, you can download the 32-bit Linux Mup rpm package, or 64-bit Linux Mup rpm package, and install it as you would any other rpm package. Most distributions have a graphical front end for rpm, which you can use if you wish. Otherwise, the typical command line invocation would be
rpm -i mup-6.5-0.i586.rpm
(run as root).

If you have a .deb based Linux distribution, like Debian or Ubuntu, you can download the 32-bit Linux Mup .deb package, or 64-bit Linux Mup .deb package, and install it as you would any other .deb package. Most distributions have a graphical front end for dpkg, which you can use if you wish. Otherwise, the typical command line invocation would be dpg -i mup_6.5-1_i386.deb
(run as root).

Mup itself has no special dependencies, but MupMate, the graphical front-end program, uses fltk, so the rpm declares dependencies on fltk and the X11 libraries that it depends on. If you intend to only use Mup in command line mode without ever using MupMate, you can install using --nodeps option if you don't have fltk libraries installed.

Alternately, you can download the Linux Mup tar file. Unpack the compressed tar file:
tar -xzf mup65lin.tgz

A mup-6.5 directory should be created. In the bin directory under that the following files should be created:

Add this bin to your $PATH or move the files to some other bin that is already in your PATH.

Under Linux, if you want to use mupdisp in non-X-window (console) mode, you will need to give it permission to write to the console device. To do this you can make mupdisp setuid to root:
chown root mupdisp
chmod 4755 mupdisp

If you are planning to use Ghostscript for printing files, set your GS_DEVICE shell variable to match your printer type, then use mupprnt. Comments at the top of the mupprnt file give a list of printers that Ghostscript supports, or check your Ghostscript documentation. Or you could print Mup output using the print option of your favorite PostScript viewer, such as gv. If you are planning to use something other than Ghostscript for viewing Mup output, you will need to provide your own programs as equivalents for mupdisp and mupprnt. For example if you have the pageview program, you can just pipe the output of Mup into pageview, or if you have a PostScript printer, you can print Mup output like any other PostScript file.

A docs directory should also get created, which includes the Mup User's Guide (as PostScript, and as HTML in a uguide subdirectory), a Quick Reference, manual pages, examples, and other helpful documents.

Once you have everything installed, you can remove the .tgz file if you wish, to free up disk space.
rm mup65lin.tgz


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